Art “Storage”

A friend on Facebook recently shared about how her six-year-old son caught her throwing away some of his artwork.  Several other parents commented about how their kids had caught them doing the same thing.

So what’s a parent to do?

Since my daughter just turned one last month, right now I can’t imagine ever throwing away any of her artwork.  After all, she’s only done two paintings so far: one is front and center on our fridge, and the other is in a frame with a custom-made plaque.  So the throwing-away-art days are in the distant future.

But considering how much artwork a kid produces throughout childhood, it’s inevitable that we can’t keep everything without violating fire code and having to rent some storage units.

So here’s my question: When the day comes where a parent must decide that some great masterpiece has to go, how do you chuck it on the sly?

Seriously, I’m looking for some creative ideas.  I don’t want to have to post on Facebook some day about how Laura Marie caught me tossing her latest creation.  Please hook a brother up with some ideas!

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Published in: on July 30, 2010 at 12:29 pm  Comments (5)  

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5 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Keep all her stuff, and every month or two you get her to check out which ones should be kept and which you can let go – she gets to keep control of what’s meaningful and you won’t have to keep everything. As an adult who enjoys painting I did the same with my own work after a year – it feels good.

  2. Step 1: Throw.it.away.when.she’s.in.bed.

    Step 2: Immediately take trash out to curb.

    And trust me, if she’s a Training Station kid, you’ll soon enough find plenty of artwork you have to dispose of! Remember that it in no way makes you a bad Daddy. 🙂

  3. Thanks for the ideas. But I’m still leaning toward keeping absolutely everything forever and ever!

  4. Take lots of photos and create a Flickr scrapbook.
    Keep ones that you particularly like or are particularly meaningful and either frame or scrapbook them.
    Bind some together into a book, and give them to the grandparents.
    Transfer them somehow on to fabric and sew into pillows or a quilt.
    More ideas here: http://simplemom.net/what-to-do-with-kids-artwork/
    from Lesley (the one from Australia.)

  5. Thanks for your help, Lesley! Good to hear from you! 🙂


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